Q&A with Christy Marx

Write Your Way Into Animation and GamesChristy Marx is the editor of the new Focal Press book Write Your Way Into Animation and Games (with several chapters contributed by End to End Game Development authors Nick Iuppa and Terry Borst).  She was kind enough to answer a few questions about the book for our readers.

Q: Tell us a little about ‘Write Your Way…’ and its mission.

A: The book is designed to help anyone who is interested in these two fields of writing – animation and videogames – to learn the basics and gain other vital info that can help them to work in these creative fields. It’s filled with practical information, guidance, and insight from six authors with wide experience and expertise. This isn’t theory or guesswork; it’s realistic, hard-earned data that people need to know to write for animation or games.

Q: What prompted you to put the book together?

A: Focal Press asked me if I would be interested in editing together such a book and I jumped at the chance. There’s a great deal of overlap between animation and games, with animation series and movies routinely developed into games, and games having potential to become animation. They tend to utilize the same genres, especially the various flavors of fantasy and science fiction. There are some similarities in the craft — writing scenes for games is equivalent to writing animation in that you’re working with animated characters and settings vs live action. Consequently, knowing the ins and outs of animation writing is beneficial to writing for games. Combining these two fields of writing in one book made a lot of sense.

Q: What surprised you most in collecting material and editing the book?

A: I can’t say that anything surprised me because I fully expected to find a wealth of material to work with and I did. The new book draws from five books by six authors, so it was an embarrassment of riches. I did my best to pull together selections that created a well-rounded book that could stand on its own as a writing manual, while enticing people who wanted more to seek out the original books.

Q: We know you’ve been involved in the development of massively multi-player online games (MMOGs); do you see this environment as a suitable one for serious games?  If so, talk a little about what might be possible in the way of applications and user experiences, based on your MMOG expertise.

A: My personal take is that a traditional MMOG wouldn’t work well for serious games because serious games usually have a focused, specific educational or training goal. A traditional MMOG is about having an open-ended world, backed up by some lore, but built primarily around social activities, quests and (usually) battle. However, I think there are interesting possibilities around crafting a serious game within an MMOG-like world, but geared toward a more specific goal.
What would make it unique would be the involvement of large numbers of other people. Would they work in cooperation toward the goal or would they be in competition? It depends on lot on the purpose behind the serious game, but it would be a wonderful challenge!

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Mini-Interview Q&A – for endtoendgamedevelopment.com

Inbox X
General X

Terry Borst
Christy, Below you’ll find the mini-interview questions. They’ll have a sligh…
May 9
Christy Marx
I’m such a doofus. I got caught up with the end of the contract I was working…
May 23 (10 days ago)
Terry Borst
Why not? We can give one more push to WRITE YOUR WAY… and maybe we’ll all b…
May 23 (10 days ago)
Reply
|

Christy Marx

to Terry

show details May 26 (7 days ago)

Here you go!

===================================

1.      Tell us a little about ‘Write Your Way…’ and its mission.

The book is designed to help anyone who is interested in these two fields of writing – animation and videogames – to learn the basics and gain other vital info that can help them to work in these creative fields. It’s filled with practical information, guidance, and insight from six authors with wide experience and expertise. This isn’t theory or guesswork; it’s realistic, hard-earned data that people need to know to write for animation or games.

2.      What prompted you to put the book together?

Focal Press asked me if I would be interested in editing together such a book and I jumped at the chance. There’s a great deal of overlap between animation and games, with animation series and movies routinely developed into games, and games having potential to become animation. They tend to utilize the same genres, especially the various flavors of fantasy and science fiction. There are some similarities in the craft — writing scenes for games is equivalent to writing animation in that you’re working with animated characters and settings vs live action. Consequently, knowing the ins and outs of animation writing is beneficial to writing for games. Combining these two fields of writing in one book made a lot of sense.

3.      What surprised you most in collecting material and editing the book?

I can’t say that anything surprised me because I fully expected to find a wealth of material to work with and I did. The new book draws from five books by six authors, so it was an embarrassment of riches. I did my best to pull together selections that created a well-rounded book that could stand on its own as a writing manual, while enticing people who wanted more to seek out the original books.

4.      We know you’ve been involved in the development of massively multi-player online games (MMOGs); do you see this environment as a suitable one for serious games?  If so, talk a little about what might be possible in the way of applications and user experiences, based on your MMOG expertise.

My personal take is that a traditional MMOG wouldn’t work well for serious games because serious games usually have a focused, specific educational or training goal. A traditional MMOG is about having an open-ended world, backed up by some lore, but built primarily around social activities, quests and (usually) battle. However, I think there are interesting possibilities around crafting a serious game within an MMOG-like world, but geared toward a more specific goal.
What would make it unique would be the involvement of large numbers of other people. Would they work in cooperation toward the goal or would they be in competition? It depends on lot on the purpose behind the serious game, but it would be a wonderful challenge!

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Terry Borst

to Christy

show details May 26 (7 days ago)
Got it; might be a few days before I get it posted…

Terry

– Show quoted text –

On Wed, May 26, 2010 at 5:23 PM, Christy Marx <cm@christymarx.com> wrote:

Here you go!

===================================

1.      Tell us a little about ‘Write Your Way…’ and its mission.

The book is designed to help anyone who is interested in these two fields of writing – animation and videogames – to learn the basics and gain other vital info that can help them to work in these creative fields. It’s filled with practical information, guidance, and insight from six authors with wide experience and expertise. This isn’t theory or guesswork; it’s realistic, hard-earned data that people need to know to write for animation or games.

2.      What prompted you to put the book together?

Focal Press asked me if I would be interested in editing together such a book and I jumped at the chance. There’s a great deal of overlap between animation and games, with animation series and movies routinely developed into games, and games having potential to become animation. They tend to utilize the same genres, especially the various flavors of fantasy and science fiction. There are some similarities in the craft — writing scenes for games is equivalent to writing animation in that you’re working with animated characters and settings vs live action. Consequently, knowing the ins and outs of animation writing is beneficial to writing for games. Combining these two fields of writing in one book made a lot of sense.

3.      What surprised you most in collecting material and editing the book?

I can’t say that anything surprised me because I fully expected to find a wealth of material to work with and I did. The new book draws from five books by six authors, so it was an embarrassment of riches. I did my best to pull together selections that created a well-rounded book that could stand on its own as a writing manual, while enticing people who wanted more to seek out the original books.

4.      We know you’ve been involved in the development of massively multi-player online games (MMOGs); do you see this environment as a suitable one for serious games?  If so, talk a little about what might be possible in the way of applications and user experiences, based on your MMOG expertise.

My personal take is that a traditional MMOG wouldn’t work well for serious games because serious games usually have a focused, specific educational or training goal. A traditional MMOG is about having an open-ended world, backed up by some lore, but built primarily around social activities, quests and (usually) battle. However, I think there are interesting possibilities around crafting a serious game within an MMOG-like world, but geared toward a more specific goal.
What would make it unique would be the involvement of large numbers of other people. Would they work in cooperation toward the goal or would they be in competition? It depends on lot on the purpose behind the serious game, but it would be a wonderful challenge!

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